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3 Featured Children & Young People Families Health & NHS Social Care

Liz’s contribution to the “Autism Community: Mental Health and Suicide” debate

You can watch and read Liz’s contribution to the Autism Community: Mental Health and Suicide debate below:

“First, I thank the hon. Member for East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow (Dr Cameron)—sorry for my pronunciation—for her thoughtful and comprehensive speech, and for setting out the difficulties that people with autism face. I am tempted to say, “What she said,” but I do not think that does justice to the situation.

I just want to touch on a few points. Earlier this year I met Autistica, a charity that does research into autism. If other hon. Members have not seen its report “Personal tragedies, public crisis”, which looks into why people with autistic spectrum disorders die early—up to 16 years early, as the hon. Lady said—I would encourage them to do so. It makes shocking reading. The key points include the point that autism in itself is not a mental health problem, but that eight out of ten autistic people will face mental health difficulties, such as anxiety and depression. Four out of 10 children with autism have two or more mental health problems. The research also shows that suicide is a leading cause of death among people with autism. Autistic adults without a learning disability are nine times more likely than others to die by suicide, and autistic adults with a learning disability are twice as likely to be die by suicide. Those are shocking figures. Suicide is preventable, and we need to do much more to reduce those figures.

We also need to recognise some of the specific problems people face. As other Members have said, many mental health problems can look different in autistic people. We need to recognise that and make sure that the issue is addressed, and that people have the appropriate treatments and are dealt with properly.”

“Intervention from Barry Sheerman MP for Huddersfield:

My hon. Friend is quoting from an excellent piece of research, but is she aware that the autism commission I chair has ​conducted a piece of work about the spectrum of obstacles and the difficulty that people with autism face in getting through to the right people in the health service? Those two pieces of research are so powerful.”

“I thank my hon. Friend for that intervention, and I absolutely agree that the two pieces of work go together and can help us to improve services for people with autism spectrum disorders.

As others have said, it is becoming increasingly obvious that some mental health therapies are not right for people with autism and do not work in the same ways that they do for other people, and we need to do more research into those areas.

It can be difficult for autistic people to approach services for support, and we have already heard about the issues with going to a GP surgery. Autistic people and their families are also left fighting the system too often, because information is not shared.

We need to do a number of things. First, as others have said, we need to diagnose autism much earlier so that appropriate interventions may be offered to people with autism and their families. Secondly, we need to record people who have autism on GP records and collect data so that we can identify the issues and develop appropriate services. It is good that, in the Westminster Hall debate in September, the Government committed to gathering data. I hope the Minister can update us on progress on that.

Next, it would be useful to hear from the Minister what progress is being made on developing the autism care pathway proposed in the “Five Year Forward View for Mental Health”, and whether it will address suicide specifically.

There is concern that suicide prevention measures are not well designed for autistic people. I hope that the Minister will look at what needs to be done differently to reach and support autistic people in crisis.

Finally, none of the recent Cross-Government suicide prevention strategies make reference to autism. Given that we now know that the risk of suicide is so high in the autism community, and that there are very different issues to be considered, as we have heard, will the Minister commit to ensuring that the next strategy looks directly at how to help autistic people in crisis?”

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Health & NHS Social Care

Help Beat eating disorders

Earlier this week I was pleased to attend a meeting with Beat, The UK’s eating disorder charity, to look at the latest research on eating disorders throughout the UK. It showed that many people take a shocking length of time to discover they have an eating disorder. On average, there’s a 3-and-a-half year gap between symptoms developing and treatment starting. I know many of my constituents are touched by this and I am happy to work with Beat in the future to help those affected by this awful disorder.

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Community Families Social Care

Blaydon Foodbank

Foodbank imageIt’s the school holidays and Blaydon foodbank is running low on certain items. If you’re able to donate food to this vital organisation please refer to the list below.

Donations of the following are particularly welcome:

Rice, soup, tins of meat, tinned pies, tinned fruit and veg, mash, pasta sauce, breakfast cereals, biscuits, tea, coffee, and children’s snacks.

 

You can see the magnificent work that the foodbank does by following this link: 
https://gateshead.foodbank.org.uk/