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3 Featured Children & Young People Families Health & NHS Social Care

Liz’s contribution to the “Autism Community: Mental Health and Suicide” debate

You can watch and read Liz’s contribution to the Autism Community: Mental Health and Suicide debate below:

“First, I thank the hon. Member for East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow (Dr Cameron)—sorry for my pronunciation—for her thoughtful and comprehensive speech, and for setting out the difficulties that people with autism face. I am tempted to say, “What she said,” but I do not think that does justice to the situation.

I just want to touch on a few points. Earlier this year I met Autistica, a charity that does research into autism. If other hon. Members have not seen its report “Personal tragedies, public crisis”, which looks into why people with autistic spectrum disorders die early—up to 16 years early, as the hon. Lady said—I would encourage them to do so. It makes shocking reading. The key points include the point that autism in itself is not a mental health problem, but that eight out of ten autistic people will face mental health difficulties, such as anxiety and depression. Four out of 10 children with autism have two or more mental health problems. The research also shows that suicide is a leading cause of death among people with autism. Autistic adults without a learning disability are nine times more likely than others to die by suicide, and autistic adults with a learning disability are twice as likely to be die by suicide. Those are shocking figures. Suicide is preventable, and we need to do much more to reduce those figures.

We also need to recognise some of the specific problems people face. As other Members have said, many mental health problems can look different in autistic people. We need to recognise that and make sure that the issue is addressed, and that people have the appropriate treatments and are dealt with properly.”

“Intervention from Barry Sheerman MP for Huddersfield:

My hon. Friend is quoting from an excellent piece of research, but is she aware that the autism commission I chair has ​conducted a piece of work about the spectrum of obstacles and the difficulty that people with autism face in getting through to the right people in the health service? Those two pieces of research are so powerful.”

“I thank my hon. Friend for that intervention, and I absolutely agree that the two pieces of work go together and can help us to improve services for people with autism spectrum disorders.

As others have said, it is becoming increasingly obvious that some mental health therapies are not right for people with autism and do not work in the same ways that they do for other people, and we need to do more research into those areas.

It can be difficult for autistic people to approach services for support, and we have already heard about the issues with going to a GP surgery. Autistic people and their families are also left fighting the system too often, because information is not shared.

We need to do a number of things. First, as others have said, we need to diagnose autism much earlier so that appropriate interventions may be offered to people with autism and their families. Secondly, we need to record people who have autism on GP records and collect data so that we can identify the issues and develop appropriate services. It is good that, in the Westminster Hall debate in September, the Government committed to gathering data. I hope the Minister can update us on progress on that.

Next, it would be useful to hear from the Minister what progress is being made on developing the autism care pathway proposed in the “Five Year Forward View for Mental Health”, and whether it will address suicide specifically.

There is concern that suicide prevention measures are not well designed for autistic people. I hope that the Minister will look at what needs to be done differently to reach and support autistic people in crisis.

Finally, none of the recent Cross-Government suicide prevention strategies make reference to autism. Given that we now know that the risk of suicide is so high in the autism community, and that there are very different issues to be considered, as we have heard, will the Minister commit to ensuring that the next strategy looks directly at how to help autistic people in crisis?”

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Community Economy Families

Liz speaks in Universal Credit debate

I spoke in the Universal Credit debate last night. Universal Credit is being rolled out for most of Blaydon Constituency on the 1st November. We know from experience that Universal Credit is causing real problems including increased debt and more reliance on Gateshead Foodbank as people wait at least 6 weeks for their first payment. The Government must pause the roll out.

You can watch my contribution below:

“I was going to talk about the real problems experienced in my constituency—initially with the live service, the comparatively straightforward bit. I was going to talk about the huge amount of help needed by people applying for universal credit. I was going to talk about the delays in payments, and the practical problems that that causes, and about the arrears that people on universal credit are experiencing: an average of £625, as against the general average of £121. I was going to talk about the evidence that private landlords are beginning to refuse tenancies to people on universal credit and about the fear that some children could go without free school meals while their parents wait for their claims to be assessed, which is a problem that we really need to look at.

But the House has heard about all that from everyone else, so instead I am going to talk about Gateshead Foodbank, which covers my constituency and that of my hon. Friend the Member for Gateshead (Ian Mearns). In 2016 it issued 4,861 food parcels to keep families going, largely owing to the roll-out of live universal credit—and that is before we see full service.

This is about people. It is about families and children who are building up debt and going without, choosing between heat and food and making other difficult choices, and experiencing all the frustration of dealing with the new system. I ask the Government to think again about pausing. We have talked about “test, learn and rectify”; let us do that.”

 

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Families Office News

Conference review and Universal Credit roll-out

For the Party faithful, conference season is always the highlight of the year. But the contrast between red and blue gatherings this year was stark. In sunny Brighton Labour was buoyed with a packed hall, spirited debate and united in common cause around our popular manifesto whilst tory conference was overshadowed by the usual clumsy comments by Boris, a half empty conference hall, dull speeches and empty gestures.

Britain hasn’t had a pay rise for a decade, economic growth is being driven by expanding household debt and productivity is slowing at an alarming rate. The Tories have been in power for seven of those ten years and they failed this week to acknowledge that the economy is collapsing on their watch. While they teetered around the edges, Labour made bold announcements on real issues.

Last month Labour committed to end PFI, which has drained money from our public services. There will be no new PFI deals and existing contracts will be brought back in house. We’ll make sure that NHS trusts, local councils and others don’t lose out, and there is no detriment to services or staff.

Earlier this year, the PM was asked why nurses were being forced to resort to foodbanks and she replied that the issue was complex. It isn’t complex. It’s dead simple. They aren’t being paid enough.

That’s why Labour will scrap the cap on public sector pay and deliver a real living wage of £10 an hour. We will also address the gender pay gap that leaves women’s wages still trailing men’s by 14 per cent. And we will ensure every piece of legislation will be measured against its impact on women.

This Tory Government plans to invest in the north just one-fifth of what it will spend on transport per head in London. This is no surprise, looking at their Cabinet, in which 85 per cent of their senior Ministers are from constituencies in the South.

Labour are committed to a fair distribution of investment. We’ll build new regional transport links; Crossrail for the north, connecting our great northern cities from west coast to east, and extend HS2 through the North East into Scotland.

Bringing conference season to a close yesterday, Prime Minister Theresa May spluttered through a half-hearted Leader’s speech and was presented with her own P45. What a contrast with a policy-packed, confident speech from Jeremy Corbyn setting out Labour’s vision for a Britain for the many, not the few.

Next month will see the roll out of Universal Credit across my constituency. Up until now only a small number of new claimants, mostly single people, have been on universal credit but the experience in Gateshead for those few people has been extremely difficult. Rent arrears have increased and there have been long delays in payments. Now Universal Credit is being rolled out to families, many of whom will see a big drop in the amount they receive.

We know from experience to date that there have been massive delays in people receiving payment. It’s easy for many of us to think these days that we can easily find money to “tide us over”, whether that’s by credit card, overdrafts or family loans, but our experience from working with constituents is that for many people, delays in receiving benefits means real hardship and in many cases, a trip to the food bank. With families now being hit by Universal Credit, that situation will inevitably get worse. What’s more, this change will also affect many people in work but currently receiving working tax credits.

Whatever you think of Universal Credit – and I think it’s truly awful – it can’t be right to set people up to fall into rent arrears, struggle to pay the bills and feed the family while they wait six weeks or more to be paid. Many of us in Labour urged Work and Pensions Secretary, David Gauke MP, to pause the rollout and work through the problems. David Gauke rejected that call, so I fear we will see more misery for many people in the future.

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Children & Young People Community Families Schools & Education

Further real-terms funding cuts for schools

NEU

Commenting on the Education Secretary’s statement to the House of Commons on the new schools National Funding Formula, Liz Twist MP for Blaydon said:

“Today’s announcement shows the Government has yet again failed to address the real issue at the heart of our schools; that there simply isn’t enough money going to schools in the first place. At the recent General Election school cuts came up time and time again on the doorstep, with many parents and teachers concerned that many schools were struggling to cope with the increasing demand and reaching a tipping point.

“The Education Secretary has now confirmed that, despite a record number of pupils in schools and inflationary pressures, there is no new money going into the system, meaning a real terms cut for schools.

“Schools across Blaydon constituency face real uncertainty about the future. Head teachers cannot be expected to make further “efficiency savings” when they are already struggling to set school budgets. Heads need to be able to plan for the future and this announcement gives very little detail about funding beyond 2020.

“This broken promise shows the true extent of Tory contempt for pupils, teachers and parents, many of whom are still waiting for new schools to be built seven years after the school building programme was cancelled. Only a Labour government can be trusted to reverse the school cuts and invest in our young people, to make sure that every child is given the opportunity to reach their full potential.”

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Community Families Social Care

Blaydon Foodbank

Foodbank imageIt’s the school holidays and Blaydon foodbank is running low on certain items. If you’re able to donate food to this vital organisation please refer to the list below.

Donations of the following are particularly welcome:

Rice, soup, tins of meat, tinned pies, tinned fruit and veg, mash, pasta sauce, breakfast cereals, biscuits, tea, coffee, and children’s snacks.

 

You can see the magnificent work that the foodbank does by following this link: 
https://gateshead.foodbank.org.uk/

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Community Economy Families

Five more years of a Tory Government will deliver five more years of failure to fix our broken bus industry.

Commenting on Labour research demonstrating the impact that 5 more years of Conservative government on local bus services, Liz Twist MP for Blaydon commented:

“The Tories’ policy of deregulating bus services has been a total failure: across Blaydon constituency we have seen fares rise as patronage has plummeted. In the North-East bus passenger journeys have fallen by 26 million since 2010.

 “Labour will extend the powers to re-regulate local bus services to Gateshead Council if it wants them – not just to those combined authorities with an elected mayor, so that bus services can be ran in the interests of passengers. There are too many areas in North-East where pensioners have a bus pass but no bus.

 “For too long the bus industry has been allowed to put profit before passengers. A Labour Government will change that.”