Westminster hosts a reception for Acquired Brain Injury survivors

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I was honoured to speak at an APPG on Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) event yesterday, which brought together survivors of ABI at a reception in Westminster.

The group has done a great job of raising awareness of ABI and the need to improve neurorehabilitation services across the UK.

ABI is a hidden epidemic with life-long consequences. Neurorehabilitation is a vital part of the brain injury care pathway that ensures the best possible recovery for survivors – it is one of the most cost-effective treatments in the NHS. But neurorehabilitation services are variable and difficult to access, in-patient beds are lacking, community services are poor, and there is a lack of skilled personnel.

That’s why our group recently published a report on ABI – ‘Time for Change’ – which gives some key recommendations to the Government.

You can read our group’s report here: https://www.ukabif.org.uk/campaigns/appg-report/

Liz speaks on Animal Rights

 

I recently spoke in a debate on the nationwide ban of the use of wild animals in travelling circuses.

It’s about time we moved on from this archaic practice and realise that our entertainment comes at a price. I’m therefore glad that this ban will be introduced – but it is long overdue.

It is frustrating that we are way behind the times in this country, as many countries across the globe have already implemented similar bans. It is simply unacceptable that the UK is left lagging behind other countries with regards to animal welfare standards. And while this legislation is welcome, it does not go far enough to protect animal rights. We want to see more animals protected under legislation.

This is an issue I know is of great concern to my constituents, so I was pleased to have the opportunity to put these points to the Government.

Liz joins Primary Futures programme to raise the aspirations of local children

On 14 May, Liz attended the launch of the Primary Futures Parliamentary Champion programme, a major cross-party initiative that aims to raise the aspirations and broaden the horizons of primary school children.

Primary Futures is an exciting initiative pioneered by the charity Education and Employers and the National Association of Headteachers. The programme helps inspire children by connecting primary schools with local role models through an innovative online service. Volunteers from apprentices to CEOs, architects to zoologists, then give an hour a year to go into schools and chat informally to children about their work.

Children can only dream about what they know. Primary Futures shows pupils exciting futures and helps them understand that by aiming high and working hard, they can realise their dreams. In focussing on young children, the initiative can have a markedly positive effect on attainment. It is also underpinned by technology that gives schools more control over the type of event they believe would be most valuable for their pupils.

Liz commented: “Children’s career aspirations are formed at a young age and influenced overwhelmingly by who they know. All children should have an equal opportunity for a fulfilling career that is not limited by their background. I’m going to be championing Primary Futures in Blaydon as it will help open the eyes of local children to what’s possible and what they could achieve.

“I will be writing to regional business, charity, and public-sector leaders, encouraging them to volunteer and spread the word about Primary Futures in their professional networks, as a growing number of volunteers is essential to boosting these careers events. I will also be registering as a Primary Futures volunteer to share the exciting work of politics with local children.”

Nick Chambers, CEO of Education and Employers, added: “I’m delighted that Liz is supporting Primary Futures and I have no doubt that her involvement will go a long way to raising the aspirations of children in Blaydon.”

 

Liz leads cross-party letter to BioMarin

This afternoon I sent a cross-party letter to BioMarin, calling on them to make Kuvan more affordable so PKU patients in the UK are able to access it. It is about time BioMarin put patients before profits.

This follows the petition handed in to BioMarin’s London HQ last month, signed by more than 16,000 people, which asked that BioMarin make Kuvan affordable to the NHS. With BBC Newsnight recently covering the problems those with PKU face, we believe this issue is starting to get the attention it deserves.

You can read more about the campaign here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-48218737

Liz’s column, May 2019

Parliament returned last week, so we’ve finally had the chance to focus on key domestic issues; issues neglected for too long, as Westminster and Whitehall have focussed their resources almost solely on Brexit in recent months.

The extension to the Brexit deadline (and the Government’s manifest inability to bring forward an alternative plan) has allowed us time to evaluate what our priorities are and where else our energy should be focussed. Of huge importance for people right across Blaydon constituency is that of Social Care funding.

Last week, during an Opposition Day Debate, the realities of social are funding were laid bare. My colleagues on the Labour front bench reminded us that despite the Prime Minister’s promise in 2016 to tackle the burning injustices in our society, and despite her assertions that austerity is over, Government cuts have resulted in social care budgets in England losing £7 billion. Local authorities’ spending power per household is also on course to fall by an average of 23 per cent by 2020, with greater cuts to councils in the North of England, where inequality is on the up.

In Gateshead, families will have lost up to £900 in council spending since 2010. The Council has seen a 52 per cent reduction in Government funding over nine years under the Tories and Liberal Democrats, leaving 2,400 less staff to do the work on the ground.

As ever, it is the most vulnerable who are forced to suffer. The callous Tory cuts to local government mean adult social care is under a greater strain than ever. As a result, vulnerable people –such as the elderly and those with disabilities– are being left to fend for themselves, without the support they deserve.

What adds insult to injury is the fact that the much-needed Green Paper for Adult Social Care has been delayed yet again. The beginning of April marked the fifth time the Health Secretary had missed the deadline for the Green Paper, which is needed to find solutions to the funding crisis. Notwithstanding the delays, it seems that no real progress is being made.

That’s why today’s local council elections are so vitally important. Labour Councillors in Gateshead have worked hard, in very difficult circumstances, to deliver for local people. In the face of more Tory cuts, Labour Councillors are fighting back on the front line in our local communities to ensure people are supported in these rotten times.
In addition to Council funding cuts, Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue service has also seen a reduction of 147 firefighters and over 1,000 police jobs have been lost in the Northumbria, all due to austerity.

Compounded by welfare reforms that have stolen money out of the pockets of some of our most vulnerable people, child poverty is now increasing as mortality rates, which grew in recent decades have started to decline.

Last week we also had the chance to debate school funding, which has been kept firmly in the public eye by Gateshead’s campaigning head teachers.
71 out of 76 schools in Gateshead are facing real-terms reductions in funding. At the same time pupil numbers are rising – with the Government’s own statistics show that England’s schools have 137,000 more pupils in the system. With increasing numbers of pupils and decreasing funding in real terms, schools have had to make cuts in staffing as well as in all budget areas, as they look for greater efficiencies.

Headteachers in my constituency tell me that, as funding has become tighter, schools have had to cut back on essential resources – including many support staff who work with vulnerable pupils.

In recent weeks I have heard from a number of headteachers who have had to announce redundancies and stop teaching enjoyable subjects, like music. In one school alone vulnerable pupils losing their classroom support for 23 sessions per week. That is the real impact of real-terms budget reductions for local schools. If austerity was over, as the Government claim, this would not be happening.

But austerity is far from over. It is a political choice, and with the Tories in office, but struggling to retain power, the funding crisis for public service will only become more severe. That’s why today’s vote matters so much.